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Published about a month ago: “The Svea Saga: Alexander’s Unknown Heiress” by James Saint Cloud + important updates

Updated: April 17 2022, Sunday. New informations are written in this bold blue.

Good day everyone and thanks to be here on Alessandro III di Macedonia- blog about Alexander the Great and Hellenism, I’m Elena and today I’m talking to you about the new book by an author that has been out for almost a month but I only discovered it a few days ago. It’s:

The Svea Saga: Alexander’s Unknown Heiress

by James Saint Cloud

Out on February 19, 2022‎

Independently published

History reports that King Alexander of Macedonia (known as “Iskander” in the East) conquered King Darius of Persia in 330 B.C. in a five-year campaign — during which he acquired ancient treasuries containing the never-plundered accumulation of many millennia:
In 332 B.C. Alexander took the ancient treasury of Tyre in present-day Lebanon (dating from before King Hiram’s time).
A year later in 331 B.C. Alexander acquired the treasury of the Persians in Persepolis (including the combined treasures of the many realms Persia had subdued).
This opens areas of inquiry:
Did Alexander initiate what is now termed a “trust” to administer some of this treasure, placed in the care of trustees? Do these guardians of the Trust still exist?
Are there heirs to Alexander’s trust estate not yet identified by history? Are the trustees aware of them?
These are questions we shall explore and in the process we’ll enjoy a treasure hunt.

Integrity is the theme of this master storyteller’s sleuthing of some of classical history’s perplexing enlgmas, complete with a treasure hunt for the wealih destined to restore a war tom world when is released from evil’s clows.
Is it for Svea, for whom Sweden is named (though with Ittle known about her history that the accumulated treasures of ancient history are held in trust for humanity’s Intended possibilities?

Paperback
435 pages
ISBN: 979-8419502673
Item Weight:‎ 1.62 pounds – 735 gr
Dimensions: 6 x 0.98 x 9 inches – 15.24 x 2.49 x 22.86 cm
$ 12.25 – 11,66 €

Kindle
Included in the Kindle Unlimited subscription
or
ASIN:‎ B09TQ7M2NJ
File size: ‎9670 KB
$ 3.25 – 2,97 €

James Saint Cloud in an American author of many books and two other historical fiction books on Alexander the Great too:

King Alexander’s Treasure Map: His 13 Days With the Queen of the Amazons

When King Alexander returned to the Caspian Sea (330 B.C.) there came to him the queen of the Amazons named Thalestris, who ruled all the country between the rivers Phasis and Thermodon. Her beauty and strength were remarkable, and her bravery acclaimed by her countrywomen. She arrived with an escort of three hundred Amazons fully armed. The king marveled at them and at their dignity and asked why they had come. She replied that it was for the purpose of getting a child, as he had shown himself to be the greatest of all men in his achievements, and she being superior to all women in strength and courage, that the offspring of such parents must surely surpass all other mortals in excellence. The king was delighted at this and granted her request, consorting with her for thirteen days, after which he honored her with fine gifts and she departed home.— Diodorus Siculus, Library of History.
1st century B.C. Was there a child? What happened when they met? No one has ever said.

January 18, 2015
290 pages

King Alexander’s Gold: The Treasury of Ancient Tyre

The island fortress of Tyre had never fallen until the assault by King Aleaxander of Macedonia in 329 B.C. Two thousand years’ of treasure lay accumulated there.
Two years later Alexander acquired the treasury of ancient Babylon and Persia at Persepolis, the heaped-up wealth of five millennia.
Where did the treasure go?
Has some of it been in the hands of an ancient Trust since then?
Our story opens in Tyre during Crusader times.

February 8, 2020
284 pages

I also discovered this new writing in the synopsis of these two “old” books:

“Please note that most of the contents of this book are now included in The Svea Saga (James Saint Cloud) and is the recommended way to hear the author’s theoretical story of Svea’s proyal parentage.”

Thus it seems that this latest book The Svea Saga: Alexander’s Unknown Heiress is a revised, corrected and united version of the other past two books. I like that an author always tries to improve and correct himself but if I had known before I don’t know if I would have taken the first two books.

Upon receiving the book The Svea Saga: Alexander’s Unknown Heiress I found this other written at the end of it:

The Svea Saga reproduces most of the previously published King Alexander’s Treasure Map and King Alexander’s Gold, which will remain in print for now for the few parts not contained in Svea.”

BUT I contacted the author and he told me some useful information!

James says: “The Svea Saga is meant to take the best of the two other books to be joined as one. The inclusion of the characters Omar and Sharif allowed me to build in the motif of integrity and another love story (Olga), and to be creative with it in new ways, as with a treasure hunt or two. There was some added suspense produced by putting Svea up front, whereas she appears in Treasure Hunt at the end as a way to tie the scheme up in a final bow.

For a reader who is strictly an Alexander-enthusiast the book to suggest is King Alexander’s Treasure Map, since it is completely devoted to Alexander except for the segment of the book related to the Scandinavian chronicler of the stories. To honor you and readers of your blog Alessandro III di Macedonia I have reduced the price of the book to $9.25 on Amazon, near the minimum allowable, instead of $23.

King Alexander’s Treasure Map offers creative solutions to several historical enigmas: What was going on the time Bucephalos was stolen? The day in Gordium when the knot was cut? The 13-day meeting with Queen Thalestris by the Caspian Sea? What impact might her visit have had on Alexander’s decision to go on east to India? Did Thalestris have his child? 

The implications of Thalestris birthing Alexander’s heir are the subject of The Svea Saga — which also contains most of the content of King Alexander’s Treasure Map.  

I personally prefer The Svea Saga since it supplies all the stories in the other bookswith increased attention to the theory of Alexander’s lost heiress and the disposition of the treasuries of Tyre and Persepolis — which if true could constitute Alexander’s considerable legacy to his child and to the world. 

I don’t recommend to your readers the sequel King Alexander’s Gold since it contains only a brief story about Alexander at Tyre the day it fell to him. Much of this book is repackaged in The Svea Saga.  

I am more a story-teller than a historian; my joy is to sleuth the unknowns of history and to create stories to inquire of the “might have been” scenarios. History’s events are the colors with which I paint.”

I’d like to thank the author for this valuable information that recommends us the reading of King Alexander’s Treasure Map: His 13 Days With the Queen of the Amazons which is now discounted on Amazon! Enter “978-0692321041” or “King Alexander’s Treasure Map: His 13 Days With the Queen of the Amazons” on your local Amazon and you’ll find the paperback version at a discounted price (it costs 8,65 € on Amazon.it)! With this new informations, I’m curious to read the book!

Alexander enthusiasts will enjoy this sleuthing through classical history to address the enigmas of the day in Gordium when the knot was cut, the theft of Bucephalos, the 13-day meeting with Queen Thalestris (and the effect that visit may have had for Alexander’s decision to go on east to India), and the implications to history if Thalestris may have had a child.
The author claims, “I am not so much a historian as a story-teller and philosopher, and my joy is to sleuth the unknowns of history to create stories to inquire of the “might have been” scenarios.”
Please note that most of the contents of this book have been repackaged in The Svea Saga (James Saint Cloud) to complete the author’s theoretical story of Svea’s royal parentage, the child of Thalestris and Alexander. (Svea is the mysterious historical figure from whom Sweden takes its name, her origins unknown.)

When King Alexander returned to the Caspian Sea (330 B.C.) there came to him the queen of the Amazons named Thalestris, who ruled all the country between the rivers Phasis and Thermodon. Her beauty and strength were remarkable, and her bravery acclaimed by her countrywomen. She arrived with an escort of three hundred Amazons fully armed. The king marveled at them and at their dignity and asked why they had come. She replied that it was for the purpose of getting a child, as he had shown himself to be the greatest of all men in his achievements, and she being superior to all women in strength and courage, that the offspring of such parents must surely surpass all other mortals in excellence. The king was delighted at this and granted her request, consorting with her for thirteen days, after which he honored her with fine gifts and she departed home.— Diodorus Siculus, Library of History. 1st century B.C. Was there a child? What happened when they met? No one has ever said.

I’m happy I discovered this author and I hope that you too will give him a chance (if you don’t already know him) because I really believe that this new information will guide you in making the best choice among the books. I have them all and slowly I will read them and I’ll tell you about them. I’ll continue to keep an eye on this author because I think I’ll buy the other books by him that will contain references to Alexander.

Have a good day,

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